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Computer Literacy
Area-Course Description

THE NEW CORE

The new core curriculum is the foundation for all undergraduate learning at the Brooklyn Campus. It provides a common educational experience that is academically challenging, enriching student's understandings of themselves and the world around them. Students will learn to appreciate different perspectives, to consider openly new and diverse thinking, to investigate ideas with careful skepticism, and to question conventional wisdom. They will develop analytical thinking and questioning skills and become thoughtful and discerning readers, writers, and speakers. The Core is designed to integrate distinct areas of learning and to develop an appreciation of the differences and commonalities among us all.

The new Core Curriculum consists of the following credit-bearing courses as well as WAC and Computer Literacy:

Subject Area
Credits
CORE SEMINAR
3
ENGLISH COMPOSITION
3
ENGLISH LITERATURE
6
HISTORY
6
MATHEMATICS
3
PHILOSOPHY
6
SCIENCES
10
SOCIAL SCIENCES
6
SPEECH
3



WAC
(WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM)

A program aimed at ensuring that all graduates develop clear and effective writing styles through attention to grammar and other elements of composition. Throughout their academic careers, students will be expected to produce a substantial body of written work in core courses as well as in upper division courses offered by all departments on campus.

 

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COMPUTER LITERACY

All undergraduate students are required to demonstrate basic computer skills prior to graduation. Students should consult with testing center advisors.

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AREA/COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CORE SEMINAR 50
THE IDEA OF THE HUMAN
(3 credits)
An interdisciplinary course that provides a common intellectual experience with writing-intensive dimensions exploring ideas of the human condition.

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ENGLISH 16
COMPOSITION

(3 credits)
Written points of logic, substance and responsibility to the reader are stressed.
(BY PLACEMENT EXAM OR EXEMPTION FROM ENGLISH 13, 14)

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ENGLISH 61, 62, 63, 64
SURVEYS OF LITERATURE IN ENGLISH

(Total - 6 credits from above courses)
A significant portion of humanity's cultural legacy is expressed as literature.

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HISTORY 1, 2
THE HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION

(Total - 6 credits)
The study of history helps us appreciate the complexity of human affairs and understand the forces that have helped shape the modern world.

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MATHEMATICS 16
FINITE MATHEMATICS

(3 credits)
The ability to think formally and reason from data is increasingly important in a world that is being driven by scientific and technological change.
(PLACEMENT EXAMS ARE REQUIRED TO DETERMINE PREREQUISITES IF ANY)

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PHILOSOPHY 61, 62
PHILOSOPHICAL EXPLORATIONS 1 & 2

(Total - 6 credits)
The dramatic changes sweeping over the world make it more important than ever to reflect on ethical matters.

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SCIENCES
PHYSICS 20 THE PHYSICAL UNIVERSE
CHEMISTRY 21 CHEMISTRY AND MODERN TECHNOLOGY
BIOLOGY 22 BIOLOGY AND MODERN TECHNOLOGY

(Total - 10 credits)
Scientific literacy is essential if we are to understand ourselves and the world in which we live.
(SCIENCE MAJORS AND PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS MUST TAKE THE SCIENCE SEQUENCE REQUIRED OF THEIR DISCIPLINE)

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SOCIAL SCIENCES
ANTHROPOLOGY 4 PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTHROPOLOGY 5 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
ECONOMICS 1, 2 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS
POLITICAL SCIENCE 11 POWER & POLITICS
PSYCHOLOGY 3 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY
SOCIOLOGY 3 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
(Total - 6 credits from above courses)
The forms and structures of human organizations are changing and consciously structuring our public life.

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SPEECH 3
ORAL COMMUNICATION
(3 credits)
Communicating effectively is essential to the liberal education of good citizens.

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Long Island University

Brooklyn Campus

Conolly College of Liberal Arts & Sciences